Grytviken Church

Grytviken Church

South Georgia might be one of the most beautiful places in the world, but the climate and life in this sub-antarctic island is harsh. In one cozy cove of this island, among the snow covered mountains is found a wonder, a small piece from the other side of the globe - Northern Europe. This is the white, wooden Grytviken Church.


People learned about the incredible number of whales and seals in the far southern seas already in the 18th century. But harnessing of this wealth was not that simple - the processing of whales in the rough, open seas was weary complicated and risky.

Whalers used the few Sub-antarctic islands as their bases - and Southern Georgia with its deep coves was one of the best suited ones. Already in the late 19th century whalers and seal hunters spent the winter here.

Grytviken got its name in 1902 - Swedish archaeologist and geologist Johan Gunnar Andersson found here try pots left by whalers. Gryt in Swedish means - pot and wiken - cove. One of these pots now is in South Georgia Museum, Grytviken.